Focus and Adaptability

Focus

“I’m a way better instructor than that guy, yet he’s got thousands of followers.” I run into this often when working with coaches.

We have a fear or pain point of some kind:
We don’t have enough members
Class sizes are small
Marketing strategies don’t work
Students aren’t listening

We focus our attention on others and what they’re doing.
The one thing we have control over is how we feel and what we do.

Focusing our attention on others, gives up that control and puts your fate in someone else’s hands.

If you need/want more members, look at your marketing message, sales process, referrals program, retention, class structure, connection with your members, how you give value. Something is out of alignment. Figure it out and take action on it.

If a marketing strategy is missing it’s mark, make adjustments, and try again.
If students are avoiding your lessons or ignoring your teaching, what can you do to better communicate? How can you connect better? Do they align with your program?

Focus your attention inward and you will increase your impact and your success rate.

Focus on others, and you’ll be miserable and angry, no matter the circumstances.

Adaptability

Techniques, concepts, and lesson plans are the guidelines to teaching.

They create a foundation from which we can jump off.

Often, when prepared properly, that foundation can be the path.

Sometimes, we have to go a different direction to meet our students where they’re at.

When laying out a class structure I like to follow this process:

1) Write out my plan for the day including the main focus, important teaching points, and the expectation for the student.

2) Talk with students before class to feel how they are physically and mentally I’m preparation for the upcoming class.

3) Communicate the expectations for the class with the students.

4) Be willing to detach from the lesson if something more pressing arises or the lesson is missing the mark.

5) Remember if the student has one takeaway for the day, it was a great success. More is not always more. In fact, the minimum effective dose should be your mark.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s