Just Run?

*this is an excerpt from the book How to Survive an Active Killer
Running in and of itself involves fitness. Again, seems like common sense, but we don’t think about it. We assume we can run, we’ve done it before. Maybe it was yesterday, maybe last month, maybe 10 years ago. If I ever needed to, I could certainly do it again… right?
The answer is, maybe. If you’re dealt the right hand and you only need to “run” 20 feet to a barricade spot, that’d be nice.
What if you’re in the basement of a building when the attack happens and you have to run 60 feet, then climb a flight of stairs, then you discover the primary exit door was chained shut, so you have to run another 300 feet down a hallway, making three turns to get to another fire exit. Oh shit! That one is chained shut too! Now I have to go into one of the rooms and escape out a window. But wait, sounds like he’s coming, I should barricade first. Now I have to pull the door shut, move chairs, drag desks, climb up to tie my belt around the door closer to keep it from being easily opened. NOW I decide to pick up a chair and bust out the window, then climb through the window, drop to the ground then run some more. How far? Not sure. Far enough to get to a place of perceived safety.
Could you do that? Be honest.
Not only does my physical ability directly effect the potential for me to even perform the task, but it will effect how quickly you can do it. Evading isn’t always running in a straight line at a casual pace to safety. It may involve sprinting, changing direction, diving, moving things, climbing over stuff, climbing under stuff, busting windows, knocking down doors, breaking through drywall, carrying someone, and so on…
“Running” is a great option, but be real with yourself about what it might take.
Now, this should certainly be a wake up call, but DO NOT let it discourage you. Just because you are out of shape, doesn’t mean you’re dead. Just like, having some physical handicap, doesn’t make you dead either. You simply have to respect your limitations and formulate your plan around them. BE HONEST with yourself and your ability. You are more likely to survive playing to your strengths than you are, attempting to do something you weren’t meant to do.
Be good, train hard, stay safe
-aaron